How Negative Thinking Can Effect Your Health

“If someone wishes for good health, one must first ask oneself if he is ready to do away with the reasons for his illness. Only then is it possible to help him.” ~ Hippocrates

Your mind and body are linked, which can’t be seen, but only felt. Your body reflects your emotional and psychological states. A positive mental attitude and powerful immune system will be the result of a healthy spiritual, physical and emotional state. It is only when we ignore our bodies that illness is able to take control of our own bodies natural defenses.

the-power-of-thoughts1 Think of the time when your heart was racing with anticipation or fright, or that feeling in your stomach – its a result of the thoughts and emotions transferring to the physical body.

Your thoughts and feelings are linked to specific parts of the body and different illnesses. When you fall sick, the body is communicating that your way of thinking (unconscious) is out of sync with what is beneficial to our being. Your body is asking you to live in harmony, at peace with your self and your surroundings.

I came across this emotional chart which shows the mental thought patterns that form our daily experiences. It is also part of the book, “Heal Your Body” by Louise Hay – where she has listed all the common illnesses and diseases with the possible metaphysical cause.

Image: Louise Hay

If you maintain a negative attitude, that invariably attracts negative vibrations and feelings – which disrupts your body’s natural energy flow. According to Davis Suzuki in ‘The Sacred Life’, condensed molecules from breath exhaled from verbal expressions of anger, hatred, and jealousy, contain toxins. Accumulated over 1 hr, these toxins are enough to kill 80 guinea pigs! Imagine the harm negative behaviour does to your body?

I was quite astounded when I read in the chart some of the pain areas for my Mom and the related thought patterns – it was very appropriate. So if you become aware of your health problem, you can use the power of your mind and heart to heal the body. There are several ways to achieve that like Yoga, Meditation, Earthing, creative visualisation or relaxation to name a few. The power is in your mind and never forget your thoughts have tremendous power!

Here’s an excerpt from the book, “Heal Your Body” by Louise L. Hay. It shows the physical symptoms are related to a prevailing mental or emotional state -

Download part of the book, “Heal Your Body” here.

Imagine the power of your thoughts, when you are feeling some kind of pain, that can be aggravated or alleviated by your mind. If you think “I am in too much pain,” then you are going to be in pain, whereas if you think the opposite, it begins to subside. (Try it out)


Is Organic Food Worth the Extra Money?


It is, but only if you can trust you're actually getting the organic food you pay for. That's why it's a good thing that the USDA is cracking down on certifiers that failed to hold farms to national standards.

On March 2, USDA announced that it was revoking its accreditation of two certifying agencies, Certified Organic, Inc. (COI) and Guaranteed Organic Certification Agency (GOCA).

USDA says COI failed to

communicate with hired inspectors about proper procedures or ensure they were adequately trained;

adhere to internal procedures according to their operational manual;

keep confidentiality agreements on file for all employees with knowledge about certification applicants or operations;

indicate on certificates the effective dates for organic certification;

ensure adequate training for employees about the regulations;

provide clients with cost estimates including inspection fees;

clearly identify the company's responsibility to pay for any required pre- or postharvest testing; and,

verify organic system plans against the actual practices of their certified operations.

GOCA's problems had to do with "persistent noncompliance," including such things as "failure to require clients to use defined boundaries and border zones as required by the organic standards."

Why it Matters

This may all sound absurdly bureaucratic but it means the certifiers could be overlooking producers' violations of organic standards.

You can track down the records of such things on the USDA's website, and see the handful of other such enforcement actions at the National Organic Program's site.

I'd say this is progress. Organic producers are supposed to follow the rules of the National Organic Program, and to be inspected to make sure they do. If the inspectors aren't doing their job diligently, you won't be able to tell whether the organic foods you buy are worth the premium prices.

This is a key point of a recent FoodNavigator story on the market for organics. The U.S. industry is expected to go from $21.1 billion in 2010 to $36.8 billion in 2015. How come? Because of "the government's monetary and regulatory support and increasing acceptance of organic food in the country."

People will pay more for organics if they think the producer is credible. Organics are about credibility. That is why the USDA needs to fiercely enforce organic certification. Doing so protects the industry. The more of this sort of thing, the better.


How to grow your own organic kiwi fruit

The actinidias cultivated for their fruits—those typically found in grocery stores and the hardy kiwifruit that grows in North America—are very similar in their requirements.

Growing Guide

Site: North facing slopes or sites shielded from low winter and early spring sun by buildings or trees are preferred.

Soil preference: Must be well drained. Vines planted where water sits on the surface following rains arelikely to develop crown rot. Soil pHshould be between 5.0 and 6.5.

Planting: Actinidia plants are especially touchy about less than perfect site and soil conditions in their youth. For this reason, some growers coddle their plants in containers for one, even two, years. Growth can be phenomenal in carefully watered and fertilized containers, and the plants can be protected their first couple of winters in an unheated basement or a slightly heated garage.

When setting plants in the ground in soil that doesn't drain perfectly, plant each vine atop a raised mound of earth. Winter cold bites hard at plants of all species their first two or three years in the ground, especially in conjunction with intense sunlight. A wrapping of corn stalks, burlap, or similar materials will shade the developing trunks and abate the fierceness of the cold. Delay protecting the trunks until frost has penetrated the ground an inch; the plants must be exposed to some cold in order to properly acclimate to the cold months ahead. Where winters are brutal, either due to very low or fluctuating temperatures, this wrapping may be advisable even for mature plants. Remember, trunks of wild actinidias growing in their native Asian forests never are exposed to full sun.

Spacing: Allow 200 square feet per plant, a bit less for super-hardy A. kolomikta.


The burden of pollination rests mostly with honeybees, though wind and other beneficial insectsalso play a role. With few exceptions, a separate, nonfruiting male plant is needed to fertilize (and induce fruiting) of female plants. The male should be no further than 35 feet from females. Do not be surprised if it appears that female flowers have stamens, the male flower parts. The stamens are there, but the pollen they shed is sterile. Similarly, male flowers have small, nonfunctional ovaries.

One male plant can fertilize the flowers of 8 or so females, and male and female plants need not be the same species of Actinidia in order to cross-pollinate. Bloom times of male and female flowers must coincide, though.

Hand pollination is practical if you grow only a few plants. Merely pluck off a male blossom and lightly rub it on a half-dozen female flowers. Then go pluck another male, repeat the rubbing, and so forth.


Actinidias are rampant plants and their trunks never become sturdy enough to hold the plants up off the ground of their own accord. Under cultivation plants must be trained to some sort of support that is both sturdy and allows vines adequate room to ramble.

A trellis used by commercial kiwifruit growers, and suitable for all actinidias, consists of wires stretched between 6-foot-high T-bar supports spaced 15 to 20 feet apart. At some sacrifice to fruit production, but with perhaps a gain in beauty, actinida vines can be coaxed up a variety of other structures such as a gazebo, a pergola, or even along a split rail fence

Training and pruning

The goals in training and pruning are to make a potentially tangled mass of rampant shoots manageable and easy to harvest, and to keep a vine fruitful by allowing adequate light to fall within the plant canopy. Pruning also stimulates an annual flush of new wood, important because flowers, and, hence, fruits, are borne toward the bases of current seasons' shoots that grow from canes that grew the previous year only.

Not all the new shoots that grow from the previous year's canes will fruit. Some canes may have been too shaded the year before, or the vine may be too young. Those canes that are fruitful will produce fruiting shoots at their basal half-dozen or so buds; the buds further out are capable of producing shoots that will fruit the next year.

An established actinidia vine consists of a trunk, permanent cordons, and fruiting arms (or canes). Training and pruning are effected by tying shoots to supports and by pruning the plants while they are growing during the summer, and again while they are dormant. Late winter, before the buds swell, is the optimal time for dormant pruning.

First develop the trunk by training a vigorous shoot up along a 1 to 2 inch pole. Train the trunk-to-be against, not around, the pole, tying it at periodic intervals. If the plant has been grafted, it is important that the developing trunk originates above the graft.

When the "trunk" reaches just above the center wire of the trellis—either during the growing season or the dormant season—it is time to develop two permanent cordons. Cut the trunk to just below the height of the middle wire and train the two shoots that grow from the topmost buds on the trunk along the middle wire, in opposite directions.

Sometimes a developing trunk will make weak growth its first season, not even reaching the height of the wire. In this case, cut the trunk back by half while the plant is dormant. This will stimulate vigorous growth the following season.

The first dormant season after the cordons form, cut off all excess growth along trunks and shorten the cordons to about 2 feet. Shorten cordons each dormant season, leaving 2 feet of growth of the previous season, until they reach their allotted length of about 7 feet in either direction along the wires. After that, cut back the cordons each dormant season to 7 feet.

Fruiting arms will grow out perpendicular to, and be draped over, the wires. The arms should be spaced a foot apart on opposite sides of the cordon; prune away any excess canes during the dormant season. Tie the fruiting arms to the side wires to keep them from blowing around, unless the arms are too stiff to bring to the wire. The first crop will form on shoots directly from these arms; future crops will form on shoots from laterals off these arms.

Training is now complete, and annual pruning will consist, first, in shortening the ends of the cordons each winter to where they grew from the previous year. The fruiting arms give rise to laterals that fruit at their bases, and during each dormant season, cut these laterals to a few buds beyond where they fruited 18 inches long is about right for each lateral (or, if you want to be more precise, four buds for A. deliciosa and eight for small-fruited species). These buds likewise grow into shoots that fruit at their bases in the subsequent season; in winter, these shoots correspondingly are pruned to a few buds beyond where they fruited, and thinned to remove those that are crossing or spindly. Usually only one strong fruiting cane, whether it is the original arm or one of its laterals or sublaterals, is retained following winter pruning. When a fruiting arm with its lateral, sublateral, and subsublateral is two or three years old, cut it away to make the room for a new fruiting arm.

Summer pruning of actinidias is aimed at keeping the lusty vines in bounds. The trunks must be kept clear of shoots, so any that form are cut away as soon as noticed. Also, cut back excessively rampant shoots growing off the cordons to short stubs, which leaves buds for future replacement arms. Any tangled shoots should be cut away before the vine starts to strangle itself. One other bit of summer pruning: shorten fruiting arms and their laterals if they get too long.

Since male plants are needed only for their bloom, they can be pruned sharply right after they bloom, removing about 70 percent of the previous year's growth. Cut back their flowering shoots to a new shoot, which will flower the following year. Male vines do not need to put any energy into fruit production, so generally are more vigorous than female vines.

For a punctilious approach to plants on pergolas, allow the plants to grow a few, rather than just two, permanent cordons. Shorten fruiting arms to just a few buds. This drastic pruning of each arm limits the number of fruits per arm, but this reduction is compensated for by the increased number of arms on each plant because of the increased number of cordons.

All actinidias need annual pruning for maximum fruit production. That said, let it be known that the vines do fruit with no more pruning than a yearly, undisciplined whacking away aimed at keeping the vines in bounds. Such was the objective in pruning hardy kiwifruits planted as ornamentals at old estates. These vines happily and haphazardly clothe pergolas with their small, green fruits hanging—not always easily accessible nor in prodigious quantity—beneath the leaves.


Girdling is a technique that induces fruiting and hastens maturity and budbreak (uh-oh!) by disrupting the flow of nutrients and hormones in the stems. In late summer, make two parallel cuts, one sixteenth of an inch apart, on the trunk, and remove the strip of bark from between the cuts. Do not girdle any vine that is in a weakened condition, or cut too deeply—remove just the outer bark


A mature kiwifruit vine can produce more than 200 pounds of fruit. One hundred or more pounds is possible from a single cold-hardy kiwifruit plant. Even in frigid, northern areas of Russia, vines will produce 20 pounds or more of fruit.

Harvest semi-tropical kiwifruits by snapping them off their stalks when the skins turn brown and samples of cut fruit show black seeds. The fruit will be hard, but will soften and sweeten in a week at room temperature. In a cool room, such fruit will keep for two months. If the fruit is refrigerated to near freezing, and the humidity maintained at 95 percent (with a plastic bag having just a few small holes, for example), the fruit will store for 9 months! Let firm-ripe fruit soften before eating. This can be hastened by putting the fruit in a bag with an apple.

Hardy and super-hardy kiwifruits drop or come off easily from the vines when they are ripe. Picked firm-ripe with their stems attached, these small fruited kiwifruits store as well as the large kiwifruit.


Unsafe Levels of Chemicals Found in Popular Canned Foods

Photo Credit: Simon Smith / Istock

Find out how to avoid bisphenol A exposure and how the industry responded to the report. Here’s a good reason why food manufacturers don’t want to test for harmful chemicals. If you test, you might find something you don’t want to.

Consumer Reports did just that, it tested a bunch of canned juices, soups, tuna, and green beans and found bisphenol A (BPA) in almost all of them — even the ones labeled organic or bisphenol A-free.

BPA, you may recall, is a chemical in polycarbonate plastics that acts as an endocrine disruptor. How harmful is it? Debate rages. These new data will add to the debate.

CR says it found the highest levels of BPA in some samples of canned green beans and canned soups:
Canned Del Monte Fresh Cut Green Beans Blue Lake had the highest amount of BPA for a single sample in Consumer Reports tests, with levels ranging from 35.9 parts per billon (ppb) to 191 ppb. Progresso Vegetable Soup BPA levels ranged from 67 to 134 ppb. Campbell’s Condensed Chicken Noodle Soup had BPA levels ranging from 54.5 to 102 ppb.
Average amounts in tested products varied widely. In most items tested, such as canned corn, chili, tomato sauce, and corned beef, BPA levels ranged from trace amounts to about 32 ppb.

Because it was particularly concerned about BPA exposure for infants and young children, it tested samples of infant formula and apple juice. It found:
Similac liquid concentrate in a can averaged 9 ppb of BPA, but there was no measurable level in the powdered version.
Nestlé Juicy Juice in a can averaged 9.7 ppb of BPA, but there were no measurable levels in the samples of the same product packaged in juice boxes.

Although the BPA in Nestlé Juicy Juice averaged 9 ppb, this was not so high, but children consume a lot of juice so this levels worries the testers.

While waiting for the experts to decide just how bad a problem BPA might be for adults and children, Consumer Reports recommends reducing the risk:
Choose fresh food whenever possible.
Consider alternatives to canned food, beverages, juices, and infant formula.
Use glass containers when heating food in microwave ovens.

I would add to this: urge the FDA to finish up its scientific review right away. It would be good to know more about just how harmful BPA is, and at what levels.

Update, November 4: I love the industry response to this report: “The use of bisphenol A (BPA) in can linings is both safe and vital for food protection.


Failed Monsanto GMO Corn Pushed on African Countries with Help of Bill Gates

Elizabeth Renter | Natural Society

Even if you aren’t opposed to genetically modified crops (with all this information, how couldn’t you be) and even if you like Bill Gates and his ventures (but with all this information, how could you), this latest should be enough to get you perturbed. And if you are anti-GMO and knowledgeable of the shady and questionable ways of the Gates Foundation, this latest story out of Africa will truly make your blood boil.

According to a recent statement from the African Centre for Biosafety (ACB), failed GM corn from Monsanto is now being pushed on African countries with help from the Gates Foundation. This maize, known as MON810, has been grown in South Africa for 15 years, where it “failed miserably”. But so as not to call the seed a complete waste, Monsanto and Bill Gates are now pushing it into countries like Mozambique, Uganda, Tanzania, and Kenya—countries that need agricultural help.
“Monsanto got the science completely wrong on this one. Independent biosafety scientists have discovered that the inheritance of resistance in African stem borers is a dominant, not recessive, trait as erroneously assumed,” explained the Director of the ACB Miriam Mayet. “Hence the insect resistance management strategies that Monsanto developed, and accepted by our regulators, based on these erroneous assumptions, were utterly ineffective.”
What this means, simply, is that pests in South Africa developed a massive resistance to the chemicals in the corn, annihilating the one prominent argument for GM crops, that it is resistant to insects. The corn was such a disaster that Monsanto willingly compensated farmers for the pesticides they had to spray on their crops to further fight the insects. Compensation from Monsanto? Weird.

Now, to not waste the waste of a seed, Monsanto has donated the MON810 technology to a “philanthropic” venture of the Gates Foundation and Monsanto called Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA), and they’ve done it royalty-free.

For small African farmers with few resources, WEMA was seen as a positive thing, providing seeds that could withstand harsh conditions. But now, drought-tolerant varieties aren’t the only seeds being pushed onto the continent.

Kenya and Uganda have already begun field trials on MON810. Mozambique is changing their biosafety laws to allow the GM crop and WEMA is putting pressure on Tanzania to do the same. Currently, Tanzanian biosafety laws allow Monsanto to be held “strictly liable” for damages that could arise from the use of MON810; WEMA is understandably opposed to this. After all, they know the dangers associated with their crops even if they don’t want to admit it.

Interestingly, and frighteningly, MON810 has been genetically altered into a variety of Egyptian corn known as “Ajeeb Yieldgard” which has already been patented by Monsanto and approved for commercial growing while circumventing Egyptian biosafety laws. The Egyptian government itself has published peer reviewed studies indicating the risk of MON810 to human and animal health.

Put best by ACB researcher Haidee Swanby,

“The scariest revelation is that GM producers and regulatory authorities are making it all up as they go along, while the massive biotech PR machinery spreads the myth that these crops are connected to feeding the poor in Africa.”


Turmeric Superior to Chemical Mouthwash In Improving Oral Health


Since ancient times, turmeric has been used for remedying oral ailments, among other therapeutic applications too numerous to count.[1] Consider that plants like turmeric were first eaten for thousands of years before our species ever devised the modern day oddity of encapsulated or tableted extracts that could be swallowed without significant oral contact.  It is only logical, therefore, that after long stretches of biological time, taking the root orally as either food, spice or medicine, it would agree with and have benefit for that part of our anatomy and its unique physiology.

Indeed, recent research shows that turmeric extract and turmeric oil may even reverse precancerous changes in oral submucous fibrosis in humans.[2] [3]  In addition, there are at least a dozen studies showing turmeric extract can kill oral cancer cells,[4] including a recent study showing that turmeric extract-loaded nanoparticles kill chemotherapy-resistant oral cancer cells.[5] But turmeric's positive role to play in oral health encompasses more than relatively rare health issues like oral cancer, as it also has tangible value to the vast majority of folks who use common mouthwash in an attempt to keep their mouth clean of plaque.

Turmeric contains approximately 3-4% curcumin by dry weight. This yellow pigmented polyphenol has been studied extensively in human clinical research as a natural alternative to the common mouthwash ingredient known as chlorhexidine for the treatment of gingivitis, "inflammation of the gum tissue."

Gingivitis is classified as a non-destructive periodontal disease,[6] and involves bacterial plaque-induced inflammation, but if left untreated, it can progress to a form of periodontal disease that can be highly destructive. Some of the most common symptoms associated with gingivitis are bad breath (halitosis), and bleeding, bright, tender or swollen gums.

Chlorexidine, while considered the gold standard in dentistry for the prevention of dental plaque,[7] was flagged in 2012 in a patient safety alert issued by the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), due to its potential to induce anaphylactic reactions.[8] While chlorexidine-induced analaphylaxis is an exceedingly rare reaction, low level exposure has been confirmed in numerous scientific studies to cause a variety of complications.[9] [10] [11] Clearly, safer alternatives are needed and especially if they can be shown to be more effective.

Turmeric Mouthwash Shown Superior to Chlorexidine

In 2012, a study published in the Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology compared the efficacy of a .1% curcumin extract mouthwash + .01% eugenol (Group A) to a more strongly concentrated .2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash (Group B), in subjects with mild to moderate gingivitis. Both Group A and Group B consisted of 30 subjects who were advised to use 10 ml of mouthwash with equal dilution of water for 1 min twice a day 30 min after brushing.  They were then tracked for plaque and gingival changes at day 0, day 14h and day 21. Both their direct experience (subjective) and objective criteria were assessed at days 14 and 21.

The results were as follows:
On comparison between chlorhexidine and turmeric mouthwash, percentage reduction of the Plaque Index between 0 and 21 st day were 64.207 and 69.072, respectively (P=0.112), percentage reduction of Gingival Index between 0 and 21st day were 61.150 and 62.545 respectively (P=0.595) and percentage reduction of BAPNA [The N-benzoyl-l-arginine-p- nitroanilide assay; a measurement of pathogenic bacterial activity] values between 0 and 21st day were 42.256 and 48.901 respectively (P=0.142). [emphasis added]
In all three objective parameters tested, turmeric extract was at least as effective as chlorhexidine mouthwash at improving the patient's oral health. However, technically, the curcumin formulation beat out the chemical mouthwash in all 3 measurements, and at only one-half the concentration.

Also, subjective evaluations showed that the turmeric mouthwash was better received by the subjects.

In the characteristically conservative style of academia, the author's concluded:
"Chlorhexidine gluconate as well as turmeric mouthwash can be effectively used as an adjunct to mechanical plaque control in prevention of plaque and gingivitis. Both the mouthwashes have comparable anti-plaque, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties."
Additional human clinical research has confirmed curcumin's effectiveness as a chlorexidine alternative in reducing plaque,[12] as well as reducing plaque-associated gum inflammation.[13]

One of the major differences with a turmeric (curcumin)-based mouthwash is that if one happened to swallow some, it would not result in the type of adverse effects associated with a biocidal/antiseptic chemical such as chlorhexidine. In fact, given the broad range of documented health benefits of turmeric, it would actually provide some side benefit, were this to happen.

Ultimately, the choice is yours. But remember, always exert caution when embarking on any new dietary and/or supplement change, and do so under the guidance of a trained professional such as a medical herbalist or integrative physician. And remember, the quality of the herb will depend on whether it was organically produced (non-irradiated), well-handled and preserved in order to eliminate mycotoxins and related microbial contaminants.


[1] Note: Our research project on turmeric alone has identified over 600 experimentally confirmed health benefits of turmeric and/or curcumin.

[2] Jayashree Joshi, Sadhana Ghaisas, Ashok Vaidya, Rama Vaidya, D V Kamat, A N Bhagwat, Sumati Bhide. Early human safety study of turmeric oil (Curcuma longa oil) administered orally in healthy volunteers. J Assoc Physicians India. 2003 Nov ;51:1055-60. PMID: 15260388

[3] Balwant Rai, Jasdeep Kaur, Reinhilde Jacobs, Jaipaul Singh. Possible action mechanism for curcumin in pre-cancerous lesions based on serum and salivary markers of oxidative stress. J Oral Sci. 2010;52(2):251-6. PMID: 20587949

[4], Professional Database Feature: Focus Curcumin Articles to Oral Cancer (17 results)

[5] Pei-Ying Chang, Shu-Fen Peng, Chao-Ying Lee, Chi-Cheng Lu, Shih-Chang Tsai, Tzong-Ming Shieh, Tian-Shung Wu, Ming-Gene Tu, Michael Yuanchien Chen, Jai-Sing Yang. Curcumin-loaded nanoparticles induce apoptotic cell death through regulation of the function of MDR1 and reactive oxygen species in cisplatin-resistant CAR human oral cancer cells. Int J Oncol. 2013 Oct ;43(4):1141-50. Epub 2013 Aug 5. PMID: 23917396

[6] The American Academy of Periodontology. Proceedings of the World Workshop in Clinical Periodontics. Chicago:The American Academy of Periodontology; 1989:I/23-I/24.

[7] Amita M Mali, Roobal Behal, Suhit S Gilda. Comparative evaluation of 0.1% turmeric mouthwash with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate in prevention of plaque and gingivitis: A clinical and microbiological study. J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2012 Jul ;16(3):386-91. PMID:23162334

[8] MHRA, Medical Device Alert, Issued Oct. 2012

[9] Sivathasan, Niroshan; Ramamurthy, Nitin Kumar; Pabla, Ravinder Singh (2010). "Chemical Burns Associated with Chlorhexidine-Alcohol Solution: An Avoidable Complication?". Journal of Burn Care & Research 31 (5): 833. doi:10.1097/BCR.0b013e3181eed4d6. PMID 20644490

[10] Sivathasan, N; Sivathasan, N; Vijayarajan, L (2010). "Chlorhexidine's complications". Journal of perioperative practice 20 (8): 300–1. PMID 20860191

[11] Sivathasan, N.; Goodfellow, P. B. (2011). "Skin Cleansers: The Risks of Chlorhexidine". The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 51 (5): 785–6.doi:10.1177/0091270010372628. PMID 21383335

[12] Pf Waghmare, Au Chaudhari, Vm Karhadkar, As Jamkhande. Comparative evaluation of turmeric and chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash in prevention of plaque formation and gingivitis: a clinical and microbiological study. J Contemp Dent Pract. 2011 ;12(4):221-4. Epub 2011 Jul 1. PMID: 22186854

[13] Sangeeta Muglikar, Kalpak Chandrakant Patil, Sumanth Shivswami, Rashmi Hegde. Efficacy of curcumin in the treatment of chronic gingivitis: a pilot study. Oral Health Prev Dent. 2013 ;11(1):81-6. PMID: 23507685

Study Proves Chocolate is Better for Your Teeth than Fluoride

Dr. Mercola |

Image: Thinkstock
Fluoride is a toxic industrial waste product that is a poison to your body even in trace amounts, yet it is added to the majority of US water supplies using the rationale that it helps prevent dental cavities.

The archaic practice continues even though it is now widely recognized that fluoride’s only justifiable benefit comes from topical contact with teeth – and even that is debatable.

To put it simply, there are FAR better options for decreasing tooth decay than ingesting a harmful industrial pollutant or using a topical poison like fluoride… in fact, new research suggests even chocolate extract would would make a better alternative.

Chocolate Toothpaste Works Better Than Fluoride

A recent study presented at the American Dental Association (ADA) 2013 Annual Session pitted fluoride toothpaste against a new toothpaste that contains the naturally-occurring cacao extract theobromine.

This test determined which product better repaired and re-mineralized exposed dentin (the tissue that makes up the bulk of your teeth below the enamel). Exposed dentin is a leading cause of tooth hypersensitivity.

The results showed that patients who brushed their teeth with the cacao-extract toothpaste twice a day for one week had “100 percent dental occlusion” with their tooth dentin becoming re-mineralized or repaired. According to a press release:
“The comparison to toothpastes containing fluoride - one as much as 5,000 ppm [parts per million] - validates what our research has shown all along: that Rennou [the cocoa extract] … is more effective and safer than fluoride, which can be toxic if ingested."
Past research has also shown that the chocolate ingredient theobromine works better than fluoride. When lesions in artificial enamel were treated with theobromine, remineralization occurred at a greater rate than when they were treated with fluoride.2 The study found, in fact, that theobromine made teeth less vulnerable to bacterial acid erosion that could lead to cavities.3

Scientists Now Questioning Whether Fluoride Works to Fight Cavities

With potential alternatives like theobromine, which, unlike fluoride, are not harmful when swallowed, it’s unfortunate that fluoride can still be found in a vast assortment of toothpastes, mouthwashes and professionally applied fluoride treatments. It's even added to your drinking water for this purpose, as mentioned.

Yet fluoride, long heralded as the answer to decaying teeth, is receiving increasing scrutiny – and for good reason.

A groundbreaking study published in the journal Langmuir uncovered that the fluorapatite layer formed on your teeth from fluoride is a mere six nanometers thick. To understand just how thin this is, you'd need 10,000 of these layers to get the width of a strand of your hair!

Scientists now question whether this ultra-thin layer can actually protect your enamel and provide any discernible benefit, considering the fact that it is quickly eliminated by simple chewing. They wrote:

“ …it has to be asked whether such narrow… layers really can act as protective layers for the enamel.”

Continue reading at

Here is a good video on some of the dangers of fluoride: